Upper Learning Curriculum

The goal of the curriculum in Upper Learning is for students to find success – success in their transition from eighth grade into the ninth grade, success as they move from the freshman year to the senior year, and success in the transition to college. Upper Learning teachers present all classes at a challenging and engaging level; the Galloway School does not offer honors courses. The school offers Advanced Placement courses in all disciplines; enterprising students may apply for their first AP course as sophomores.

Many classes contribute to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) initiatives: four AP classes in the sciences, two levels of AP Calculus, and a new offering in independent science research. The school offers three different levels of mathematics courses, Advanced, Regular, and Conceptual for Geometry and above. The school offers coding classes and other applications of technology courses.

The school has always provided a strong foundation in the Humanities, in English, in Social Studies, and World Languages. In English courses, juniors and seniors may choose from two AP courses and a range of semester-long seminar courses. The Social Studies and World Language classes prepare students to become active and informed citizens of both the United States and the future global society as well.

Upper Learning teachers provide a range of courses in the visual and performing arts. Visual arts students may choose from two levels of drawing, painting, and ceramics. In performance, students may choose chorus, strings, band, as well as acting and technical theatre.

Upper Learning provides a balanced academic program, enabling students to choose a wide range of academic courses and co-curricular offerings throughout high school.

Full list of courses offered in 2016-17, by subject:

English

The English Department strives to expose students to a wide range of literary genres from a variety of eras and cultures. At each grade level, students focus on developmentally appropriate skills such as summarizing verbal information, identifying concepts, demonstrating appropriate use of skills, generating their own material, and problem solving. Thus, critical thinking development and comfort is key to the UL English experience. All components of writing—drafting, revising, editing—are emphasized. Because four years of English are required for graduation, students must be enrolled in an English class each semester of Upper Learning.

Introduction to Literature and Composition (English/Yearlong)

This yearlong course concentrates on reading a variety of texts, including short stories, poetry, a Shakespeare play, one novel, and an epic, and writing in different modes, including personal narrative and literary analysis. The core texts serve as catalysts for both class discussion and written reflection. Students explore all facets of the writing process, from research and brainstorming, to drafting, peer editing and revising. The course also covers the basic study skills of effective close reading and reviews the fundamentals of grammar, punctuation, and usage.

Evaluation: essays, tests, quizzes, projects, presentations, and class participation
Prerequisites: 8th-grade English
Grade level: 9th

Close Reading; Close Writing (English/Yearlong)

Students will carefully examine limited major literary works. In an effort to cultivate a thorough understanding and appreciation of language, it is necessary to dive deep and spend time with the text at hand. Students will become fluent in evaluating how diction, key literary devices, and grammar choices work in tandem to create voice within each text. In writing, the crisp articulation of form and function will be of primary focus. Past selections have included Cormac McCarthy’s All the Pretty Horses and Barbara Kingsolver’s The Poisonwood Bible.

Evaluation: expository and personal essays, projects, presentations, and class participation
Prerequisites: English 9
Grade level: 10th

Options that fulfill the English requirement for 11th grade include: a) AP English Language and Composition OR b) Persuasion: The Art and Craft of the Essay & Creative Nonfiction

Advanced Placement English Language and Composition (English/Yearlong)

AP English Language and Composition is a full year rhetoric and writing intensive course. It investigates the rhetorical and argumentative methods of non-fiction prose. The course engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of rhetorical contexts, and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. Both writing and reading should make students aware of the interactions among a writer's purposes, audience expectations, and subjects as well as the way conventions and the resources of language contribute to effectiveness in writing. Students develop tone, diction, and rhetorical vocabulary. A summer reading and writing assignment is required.

Evaluation: essays, timed writing, discussions, tests, quizzes, seminars.
Prerequisites: English 10; admission to the class is based on past grades in humanities courses, writing samples, and teacher recommendations.
Grade level: 11th grade has priority; 12th-grade students who have not previously taken the course

Persuasion: The Art and Craft of the Essay (AB) & Creative Nonfiction (CD) (English/Yearlong)

In this yearlong class that shifts its focus midyear, students will become conversant in the form and function of nonfiction persuasive and personal essay writing. Students will define, identify and apply rhetorical moves and stylistic choices specific to these two writing genres. Students will learn how to respond to specific audiences and derive the many purposes a piece of writing can have. In the second semester, students will generate their own essay material demonstrating skills such as voice, tone, and arrangement. Students will become independent revisionists and editors of their own work. Once students have mastered the persuasive and personal essay, they will write in memoir, place writing and lyric forms.

Evaluation: compositions, discussions, short responses, quizzes, seminars.
Prerequisites: English 10
Grade level: 11th grade

Seniors have two options to fulfill their English requirement.

  • Option one: If accepted, students may take the yearlong course AP English Literature and Composition.
  • Option two: Seniors may sign up for a year-long Senior Seminar exploring one of a variety of Big Ideas and Essential Questions.

Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition (English/Yearlong)

Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition is a college-level course that encourages thoughtful engagement and rigorous textual and contextual analysis of literary works in a variety of genres, including prose, drama, and poetry, and from a variety of times and places. Our course texts invite careful reading and do not yield all of their pleasure of thought and feeling the first time through.

The course places a heavy emphasis on discussion of and writing about literary texts. Notes and annotations of course texts are expected and may be collected. Students are also given many opportunities to teach their interpretation of a passage or poem to the class; to research an interesting, tangential subject; and to participate in small group work.

Two types of vocabulary are developed: that of literary analysis, building upon and deepening what students have already learned in previous English classes; and that of reading vocabulary.

Specific writing assignments accompany each major unit, typically requiring students to define their own topic. Class discussion focuses on both broad questions and specific details, including the strengths and weaknesses of the literary characters, authors’ tones and possible biases, and the range of literary conventions employed.

Evaluation is based on papers, other writing assignments, participation, and projects. A summer reading assignment is also required. To be considered for AP, interested 11th grade students must submit an essay that demonstrates their communication and reading skills.

Big Ideas & Essential Questions

In this yearlong senior seminar, students will read and think both broadly and deeply, exploring and grappling with big ideas and essential questions. Along the way, students will hone their skills as a critical thinker and compelling communicator.

Students should rank the following topics for the 2016-2017 year in order of preference, letting their broad interests guide their choice. By the end of the year regardless of the topic selected, all students will have read texts in a variety of genres, developing a sense of the relationships between texts and the cultural currents that surround them. Students will also understand that sophisticated thoughts require deliberate and thorough interaction with texts and that thinking deeply and writing well are immutably connected.

2016-2017 Topics:

  1. Coming of Age

What does it mean to grow up? How can we navigate the dual challenges of becoming who we want to be and fulfilling societal expectation? How do our surroundings impact these challenges? How do coming-of-age fictions from Jane Austen to Kazuo Ishiguro reĔect on questions of identity, belonging, sexuality, growth, modernization, and citizenship? ăese questions will be the occasion for intensive work on students’ own intellectual development as writers and readers.

  1. Best Books
  2. Political Theater
  3. Revenge

Evaluation: compositions, discussions, short responses, quizzes, seminars
Prerequisites: Persuasion
Grade level: 12th grade

Social Studies

Political Science (Social Studies/Semester)

Political Science is a required course in American government. Students learn about the constitutional foundation of American government, criminal law, and the federal court system. In the second term, students learn about political parties, campaigns and elections, Congress, and presidency. Students will also complete the constitutional scrapbook project exploring current constitutional issues in our society.

Evaluation: preparation, homework, quizzes, project, midterm, and final exam
Prerequisites: none
Grade level: 9th

World History (Social Studies/Yearlong)

The goal of the year-long World History course at the Galloway School is the development of informed, responsible and compassionate students able to understand the world and their role in it. As such, we aim to offer a truly global and comparative perspective on the evolution of human societies that stretches from the earliest appearance of Homo sapiens in East Africa 250,000 years ago up until the present day. Rather than the rote memorization of isolated names, dates and events, we strive to cultivate in students the skills and habits of mind social scientists use to make sense of the myriad cultures. In the world history classroom we learn to ask “why?” and “what do I think?” rather than simply “what happened?” And as we do so, we begin to develop empathy for people in other places and times, entering wholeheartedly into their viewpoints as a first step in becoming truly global citizens. Ultimately, we recognize together not only how we have been shaped by the vast mosaic of human history, but also how we might participate in shaping it ourselves in the future.

Evaluation: daily activities and discussion, significant reading of primary and secondary sources, written work, tests, and summative projects
Prerequisites: none
Grade level: 10th

American Studies History (Social Studies/Year long)

American Studies History is a yearlong course broken into two sequential semesters that encourages students to consider and explore the basic question, "What is American culture?" While the primary emphasis of the class is on studying the history of the United States, students will also look to art, music, architecture, and literature to enhance their knowledge of the past and understanding of the present. The class follows a thematic agenda. Some of the topics of study include the settlement and expansion of the United States; race, gender, and ethnicity in America; industrialization; the significance of a frontier; and the evolution of American politics.

Evaluation: daily activities, significant readings, presentations, research projects, tests, papers, essays, and discussion
Prerequisites: World History
Grade level: 11th

Advanced Placement U.S. History (Social Studies/Year long)

AP U.S. History is a yearlong course that covers the same material as the basic American Studies History course but at a much greater depth. Students use college-level texts and read many primary sources as they prepare for the AP exam, which includes objective, essay, and document-based selections. Students may not take both American Studies History and AP American History.

Evaluation: note-taking, quizzes, document-based tests, and papers
Prerequisites: World History, permission of the instructor
Grade level: 11th

Economics (Social Studies/Semester)

Economics is a required one-semester senior-level course that will introduce students to the basic concepts of microeconomics, macroeconomics (including GDP, unemployment, and demand- and supply-side economics. Students explore the externalities and forces as it relates to inequality and poverty, globally and nationally. Class format includes student discussions with teacher facilitation, reading with review questions, working collaboratively on projects, and field data and analysis.

Evaluation: quizzes, tests, projects, presentations, homework, class discussion, and participation Prerequisites: none
Grade level: 12th

Advanced Placement American Government (Social Studies/Yearlong)

The AP American Government and Politics course offers students a thorough and systematic study of United States government and politics and requires that students learn facts and concepts and understand typical political processes. Furthermore, students are guided to use specific information critically, to evaluate general propositions about government and politics, as well as to present basic data relevant to government and politics in sustained written arguments. Students will learn to analyze and interpret data, make connections to current issues, and write analytically. The topics covered include the United States Constitution, federalism, American political culture, political participation, public opinion, political parties, the 26 media, campaigns and elections, interest groups, Congress, the presidency, bureaucracy, policy-making, foreign policy, judiciary, due process, civil liberties and the First Amendment, and civil rights. Students may opt to take the AP exam and possibly receive college credit.

Evaluation: participation, writing, and tests
Prerequisites: permission of instructor
Grade level: 10th or 12th

Advanced Placement Comparative Government (Social Studies/Yearlong)

AP Comparative Government and Politics introduces students to fundamental concepts used by political scientists to study the processes and outcomes of politics in a variety of countries. The course aims to illustrate the rich diversity of political life, to show available institutional alternatives, to explain differences in processes and policy outcomes, and to communicate the importance of global political and economic changes. Careful comparison of political systems produces useful knowledge about the policies countries have effectively initiated to address problems, or, indeed, what they have done to make things worse. We can compare the effectiveness of policy approaches to poverty or overpopulation by examining how different countries solve similar problems. Furthermore, by comparing the political institutions and practices of wealthy and poor countries, we can begin to understand the political consequences of economic well-being. Finally, comparison assists explanation. Why are some countries stable democracies and not others? Why do many democracies have prime ministers instead of presidents? In addition to covering the major concepts that are used to organize and interpret what we know about political phenomena and relationships, the course covers specific countries and their governments. Six countries form the core of the AP Comparative Government and Politics course: China, Great Britain, Mexico, Nigeria, Russia, and Iran. By using these six core countries, the course can move the discussion of concepts from abstract definition to concrete example, noting that not all concepts will be equally useful in all country settings.

Evaluation: participation, writing, and tests
Prerequisites: permission of instructor
Grade level: 12th

Advanced European History (Social Studies/Yearlong)

This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to do university-level work in European history. This work includes college-level readings, writing assignments, and exams. Class sessions will resemble college-level seminars and will depend upon student initiative and responsibility in completing assignments. The content of the course includes the political, diplomatic, religious, economic, cultural, and social history of Europe from the Renaissance to the present day. It also includes intensive training in document analysis and essay writing.

Evaluation: written assignments, exams, projects, and participation
Prerequisites: permission of the instructor
Grade level: 12th

*The courses listed below cover the same material as that found in Advanced European History. Seniors may enroll in one of the semester offerings if space allows for regular senior-level credit.

*19th Century and 20th Century (Social Studies/Semester)

Students will study the period from 1789 to 1914. They will read Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and Karl Marx's Communist Manifestoand learn about the dramatic changes created by the French Revolution and the Napoleonic period, the Industrial Revolution, and nationalism. Students will then study the period from 1914 to 2000. They will choose from E.M. Forster's Passage to India, Erich Maria Remarque's All Quiet on the Western Front, dystopian novels such as Aldous Huxley's Brave New World or George Orwell'sNineteen Eighty-Four, and Alexander Solzhenitsyn's One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich. Students will learn about imperialism, World War I and the consequences of the Versailles Peace Treaty, the rise of totalitarian dictatorships and World War II, and the Cold War.

Evaluation: projects, papers, participation, and tests
Prerequisites: none
Grade level: 12th

*Renaissance through The French Revolution (Social Studies/Semester)

Students will study the period from 1450 to 1600. They will read Machiavelli's The Prince and Thomas More's Utopia. They will learn about the changes from medieval to early modern European history, focusing on art, religion, and the creation of nation states. Students will then study the period from 1600 to 1789. They will read Voltaire's Candide and learn about the development of absolutism and constitutionalism, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, and the Ancien Régime.

Evaluation: projects, papers, participation, and tests
Prerequisites: none
Grade level: 12th

Anthropology (Social Studies/Semester 2)

Anthropology, as the name signifies, is the study of humans as culture-bearing animals. It is a large discipline that is historically broken down into two major divisions: physical anthropology, which includes paleoanthropology and bioanthropology, ethology and human evolution; cultural anthropology, which encompasses ethnology, ethnography archaeology, folklore and anthropological linguistics.

Evaluation: ethnographic report, original ethnographic study, participation, and tests
Prerequisites: none
Grade level: 9-12

Psychology (Social Studies/Semester 1)

Psychology is a semester-long course that explores the effects of heredity and environment on human mind and behavior. One emphasis of psychology is the biopsychological; another is the dynamics of behavior and mind; and a third is the behavioral-cognitive perspective. Students are expected to read and review a book by a prominent psychologist and to complete an experimental or descriptive research project. Major topics include scope of psychology, paradigms in psychology, neuroscience and behavior, brain structure and function, nature and nurture, development, learning and memory, personality, motivation, abnormal psychology and the treatment of mental disorders, and social psychology.

Evaluation: quality of major assignments, classwork, midterm and final examinations, and participation
Prerequisites: Integrated Chemistry
Grade level: 11th or 12th

Philosophy (Social Studies/Semester 2)

Philosophy is a Semester 2 course in which students examine ways of knowing, personal values, logic, discourse, and some of the great philosophers. Students read the writings of a number of philosophers (Plato, Descartes, Hume, Hill, and James, among others) as well as select a philosopher to study on their own whose life and works they will present orally to the class. In addition, students reflect on their personal philosophies, apply the hard-won knowledge of the thoughts of others to that personal worldview, and achieve, thereby, a richer and deeper understanding of self. Major assignments include an oral presentation on the researched philosopher and a personal apologia.

Evaluation: quality of thought and communication (writing and speaking) for assignments, and engagement in class discussions; quizzes
Prerequisites: none
Grade level: 12th only

Debate: Foreign Policy with China (Social Studies/Fall Semester)

This course examines the communication process within the context of public speaking and argumentation. Students will learn the roles of verbal and nonverbal communication, contexts and forms of policy debate, analyze the role of the audience, logical fallacies, current events, and research techniques for debates. Students will evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of speeches in a debate context. Students will be expected to present speeches and debates on a regular basis and write essays on various speech acts. Students will be required to compete in local policy debate tournaments. This course may not be repeated.

Evaluation: written assignments, debates, quizzes, and participation.
Prerequisites: none
Grade level: all UL

Advanced Debate: Foreign Policy with China (Social Studies/Fall Semester)

This course examines verbal and nonverbal communication, contexts, techniques, and strategies in policy debate. Students will be responsible for argument research and construction, peer-coaching to novices, debate evaluation, and tournament preparation. Students will be expected to present speeches and debates on a regular basis. Students will be expected to compete in local policy debate tournaments. Since the policy topic changes annually, this course may be repeated for credit with permission of instructor.

Evaluation: written assignments, debates, quizzes, and participation
Prerequisites: Introduction to Debate (or permission of instructor)
Grade level: 10th, 11th, or 12th


Math

Four years of mathematics are required for graduation. The required sequence for college-bound students is Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II and Precalculus. Calculus is recommended for students who complete the sequence their junior year. Any student who fails a semester of math must retake that semester in summer school. All students must also pass the cumulative end-of-year exam. Math placement is based on teacher recommendations, performance, progress in the current course, and the results of the exit exam.

Algebra I (Math/Yearlong)

Algebra I explores numbers and variables. First semester consists of a review of topics from Pre-Algebra and Algebra I: working with rational numbers, the language of math, using proportional reasoning, linear equations, inequalities and systems of equations. Second semester is devoted to polynomials, factoring, quadratics, and rational and radical expressions. The concepts covered are fully integrated with other disciplines. Students need their own graphing calculators (TI-83+ preferred).

Evaluation: homework, classwork, quizzes, chapter tests, and cumulative final exam
Prerequisites: Pre-Algebra, Math 8, or recommendation of math department
Grade level: 9th

Conceptual Geometry (Math/Yearlong)

The objective of the Conceptual Geometry course is to explore various two and three-dimensional geometric figures and their special qualities and use algebra skills to solve related problems. As with most high school Geometry courses, this course will be taught from a Euclidean geometry perspective, both with and without coordinates, and a strong dependency on Parallel Line Postulates. Throughout the year, this class will examine geometric constructions, utilize deductive reasoning, make conjectures, and draw conclusions, which will lead to an adequate exposure and grasp of 2-column proofs. Second semester, a strong emphasis will be placed on the right triangle and its side and angle measures, leading to basic trigonometry. Conceptual Geometry students are allowed to process and master concepts at a slower rate, while still being expected to master the basic, fundamental geometry topics.

Evaluation: A combination of quiz/test grades, HW completion, project grades, and end-of-the-semester cumulative exams. There are opportunities for extra credit, which will be presented to the entire class or requested by student.
Prerequisite: Algebra I
Grade level: 10

Geometry (Math/Yearlong)

Geometry is a course that uses concepts learned in Algebra I to help describe and analyze patterns in the world. Students formulate deductive proofs to establish the validity of their conclusions. The first semester deals with lines and angles, inductive and deductive reasoning, triangles, and proportion and similarity. The second semester begins with right triangles and trigonometry. Students then investigate quadrilaterals, transformations, and circles. The year concludes with the study of area and volume. Students are required to use a TI-83 series calculator.

Evaluation: homework assignments, quizzes, labs, and cumulative final exam
Prerequisites: Algebra I
Grade level: 9th or 10th

Advanced Geometry (Math/Yearlong)

Advanced Geometry is a yearlong course in which students will learn the fundamentals of geometry through the experience of solving problems. Advanced Geometry students will be expected to generate proofs and apply creative thinking and Algebra I skills to solve large problems involving geometric relationships. This class includes all concepts covered in Geometry and more in-depth discussions of analytical geometry, trigonometry, and at times, the unit circle.

Evaluations: homework assignments, quizzes, tests, and projects
Prerequisites: Algebra I; teacher recommendation
Grade level: 9th or 10th

Conceptual Algebra II (Math/Yearlong)

Conceptual Algebra II expands on many of the concepts learned in Algebra I and presents new ideas. First semester, students work with equations, inequalities, linear relations and functions, quadratics, systems, and roots of quadratic equations. A brief review and practice in preparation for the October PSAT are conducted. Second semester, students study polynomials functions and expressions, and touch on rational and radical expressions and equations, exponential and logarithmic functions and probability. Graphing calculators are used in this course. The pace of this class is slower than in Algebra II and the scope includes fewer topics. However, students are prepared for Precalculus or Advanced Algebra and Trigonometry during their senior years.

Evaluation: homework, quizzes, chapter tests, cumulative examination, and projects
Prerequisite: Algebra I
Grade level: 11th

Algebra II (Math/Yearlong)

Algebra II expands on many of the concepts learned in Algebra I and Geometry and presents new ideas. First semester, students work with equations, inequalities, linear relations and functions, quadratics, systems, polynomials and trigonometric functions, and roots. A brief review and practice in preparation for the October PSAT are conducted. Second semester, students study quadratics, conics, polynomial functions and expressions, rational expression operatives, exponential and logarithmic functions, and probability. Graphing calculators are used in this course. The Texas Instrument versions are preferred, especially the TI-83+.

Evaluation: homework, quizzes, chapter tests, cumulative examination, and projects
Prerequisites: Algebra I and Geometry
Grade level: 10th or 11th

Advanced Algebra II (Math/Yearlong)

Advanced Algebra II expands on many of the concepts learned in Algebra I and Geometry and presents new ideas. This class includes all concepts covered in Algebra II and also includes additional trigonometry topics, sequences and series, and probability and counting. The class features more challenging problems and more application-based work than Algebra II. Graphing calculators are used in this course. The Texas Instruments versions are preferred, especially the TI-83+. A project will be required each semester.

Evaluation: homework, quizzes, chapter tests, cumulative examination, journals, and projects
Prerequisites: Algebra I and Geometry; teacher recommendation
Grade level: 10th or 11th (9th with departmental approval)

Advanced Algebra and Trigonometry (Math/Yearlong)

This course is intended for students who want to postpone precalculus until college. The pace will be structured to allow students more time to improve skills and to master concepts. The curriculum will include a thorough review of linear relations and functions with a focus on application, as well as of polynomial and rational functions, equations, and inequalities. The class will then move on to study systems of linear equations and various solution methods of these systems. The course will include a careful study of the nature of graphs and the family of transformations that can be performed on all functions, and students will learn how to solve polynomial and rational functions algebraically and graphically. Students were introduced to exponential and logarithmic functions in Algebra II; they will study these functions more thoroughly in this course. Students will study the unit circle and trigonometric functions.

Evaluation: homework, classwork, quizzes, tests, and projects
Prerequisites: Algebra II; admission to this course is based upon student request and/or teacher recommendation.
Grade level: 11th or 12th

Precalculus (Math/Yearlong)

Precalculus is intended to prepare students for a yearlong college- level calculus class. This course includes the study of the algebraic components of precalculus (inverse functions and relations, polynomials, and rational functions) and the trigonometric components of precalculus (trigonometric functions and their graphs, trigonometric identities, and vectors). Advanced functions and graphing are also addressed (polar coordinates, complex numbers, conic sections, and exponential and logarithmic functions), and, when time allows, there is a brief introduction to calculus and the use of limits. Students have opportunities to learn algebraically, graphically, verbally, and kinetically, and there is an ongoing focus on real-world problem solving. TI-83+ graphing calculators are used extensively throughout this course.

Evaluation: homework, quizzes, tests, projects, and cumulative exams
Prerequisites: Geometry and Algebra II
Grade level: 11th or 12th

Advanced Precalculus (Math/Yearlong)

Precalculus is intended to prepare students for a yearlong college-level calculus class. This accelerated course is designed for students who excel in mathematics and are ready for a more sophisticated investigation of precalculus. This course includes the study of the algebraic components of precalculus (inverse functions and relations, polynomials, and rational functions) and the trigonometric components of precalculus (trigonometric functions and their graphs, trigonometric identities, combined sinusoids, vectors and parametric equations). Advanced functions and graphing are also addressed (polar coordinates, complex numbers, conic sections, and exponential and logarithmic functions), and there is an introduction to calculus, including limits and derivatives. Students will work more complex problems than those in Precalculus and will have additional critical thinking opportunities. Students have opportunities to learn algebraically, graphically, verbally, and kinetically, and there is an ongoing focus on real-world problem solving. TI-83+ graphing calculators are used extensively throughout this course.

Evaluation: homework, quizzes, tests, projects, and cumulative exams 20
Prerequisites: Geometry and Algebra II, math teacher recommendation required
Grade level: 11th or 12th (10th with departmental approval)

Calculus (Math/Yearlong)

This is a yearlong course designed for students who have successfully completed Precalculus but are not ready for Advanced Placement Calculus. Students will explore the basics of calculus concepts including limits, derivatives, techniques of integration, and applications. The graphing calculator is used as a visual aid in understanding the concepts presented.

Evaluation: homework, classwork, chapter tests, and cumulative semester exams
Prerequisites: Advanced Algebra and Trigonometry, Precalculus, or Advanced Precalculus
Grade level: 11th or 12th

Advanced Placement Calculus AB (Math/Yearlong)

This is a college-level course with emphasis on the introduction of foundations and intuitive understanding of the concepts and principles of differential and integral calculus. These topics include limits, derivatives, techniques of integration, and applications. The student who completes the course satisfactorily is prepared to take the Advanced Placement Calculus AB examination. The graphing calculator is used extensively; TI- 89s are provided. Students taking AP Calculus AB will not be allowed to enroll in AP Calculus BC.

Evaluation: homework, unit tests, cumulative final examination, and projects
Prerequisites: teacher recommendation; thorough knowledge of advanced algebra techniques, analytic geometry, and trigonometry
Grade level: 11th or 12th

Advanced Placement Calculus BC (Math/Yearlong)

This course is offered to students who have already completed Precalculus or Calculus. A student may not take AP Calculus BC if she or he has already taken AP Calculus AB. In AP Calculus BC, a more rigorous and extensive survey of calculus will be undertaken and additional topics will be introduced.These additional topics will include vectors, parametric and polar functions, integration by partial fractions and parts,Taylor and Maclaurin Series, and convergence and divergence of sequences and series. Students will be prepared to take the Advanced Placement Calculus BC exam and may be able to earn college credit for their work.TI-89 calculators are provided.This class will be offered on an as-needed basis.

Evaluation: quizzes, tests, some labs, homework, projects, and cumulative exams
Prerequisites: Precalculus with teacher recommendation or Calculus
Grade level: 11th or 12th

Financial Algebra (Math/Semester)

Students in Financial Algebra will learn about applications of algebra to financial decisions and information in everyday adult life. Topics covered will include the stock market, modeling a business, banking services, consumer credit, automobile ownership, taxes, retirement planning, mortgages, and budgeting. Focus will center on the mathematics underpinning each of these topics, which include skills learned in Pre-Algebra through Algebra II.

Evaluation: projects, tests, quizzes, journals
Prerequisites: Algebra II
Grade level: 11th or 12th

Statistics (Math/Semester)

This course is an introduction to the ideas and practice of statistics, one of the more powerful and pervasive tools of our current scientifically-based society. It presents methods for turning data into information. The purpose of statistics is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students will be exposed to four broad themes: exploring data, sampling and experimentation, anticipating patterns, and statistical inference. Students will use TI-83+, TI-84, or TI-89 graphing calculators extensively.

Evaluation: class activities, quizzes, tests, projects, and cumulative exams
Prerequisites: Algebra II; can be taken concurrently with Precalculus
Grade level: 11th or 12th

Advanced Placement Statistics (Math/Yearlong)

This course is designed for students who wish to complete studies equivalent to a one-semester, introductory, non-calculus-based, college course in statistics. The purpose of the Advanced Placement course in statistics is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students will be exposed to four broad themes: exploring data, sampling and experimentation, anticipating patterns, and statistical inference. There is a strong emphasis on the conceptual understanding of the material and on the reasoning rather than a focus on memorizing formulas and doing calculations. Students will use TI-83+, TI-84, or TI-89 graphing calculators extensively.

Evaluation: class activities and simulations, quizzes, tests, projects, and cumulative exams
Prerequisites: Algebra II; can be taken concurrently with Precalculus
Grade level: 11th or 12th

Discrete Mathematics (Math/Semester)

What is the focus of mathematicians in the real world? Surely it’s not sitting around all day working on algebra or trigonometry! Take a dip into the worlds of cryptography, graph theory, combinatorics, and chaos theory and learn how math underlies and enhances these fields. Find out how classics like the Four-Color Problem and the Konigsberg Bridge Problem are extremely applicable to our lives today. This class will contain calculation, but focus will be on conceptual understanding and application.

Evaluation: class activities, projects, quizzes, demonstrations
Prerequisites: Algebra II; can be taken concurrently with any class beyond Algebra II
Grade level: 10th, 11th, or 12th

Science

Integrated Biology (Science/Year-long)

Integrated Biology is required for graduation. Topics include the following: basic biochemistry and organic macromolecules; cell structure, function, and division; cell transport and respiration; human body systems, gene expression, Mendelian genetics, epigenetics, the history of life on Earth, Linnean and phylogenetic classification, evolution. The yearlong science fair project builds skills for academic research and experimental design, as well as project and time management.

Evaluation: independent and group projects, labs and class activities, quizzes and tests, homework, science fair project
Prerequisites: passing grade in 8th-grade science
Grade level: 9th

Integrated Chemistry (Science/Year-long)

Integrated Chemistry is required for graduation. Major themes are core inorganic chemistry concepts, organic and biochemistry, and applied neuroscience. Topics include the following: measurement and problem solving; periodic law; modern atomic theory; chemical equations and bonding; thermochemistry; solutions, acids and bases; kinetic theory (gas laws); nuclear chemistry); oxidation-reduction; electrochemistry, organic and biochemistry; and neuroscience and the brain. Evaluation: tests and quizzes, long-term projects, quality and consistency of homework, laboratories, class assignments, and participation. Prerequisites: Integrated Biology Grade level: 10th Conceptual Physics (Science/Year-long) Physics is the study of the basic properties, materials, and forces that govern the natural world. This course will begin with an inventory of math tools required for physics, followed by an investigation of space, time, and matter. Students will then study standard mechanics, thermodynamics, and electromagnetics. In addition, students will hone their problem solving and mathematical skills throughout the year.

Evaluation: homework, unit tests, labs, and individual and group projects
Prerequisites: Integrated Biology and Integrated Chemistry; successful completion of Algebra II or concurrent approval by math and science department
Grade level: 11th or 12th

Integrated Physics (Science/Year-long)

Integrated Physics is required for graduation. The course focuses on using science not only to understand how the natural world operates, but also learn to engineer ways to alter the world around us. Students learn not only standard mechanics, thermodynamics, and electromagnetic found in typical physics classes, but they are also taught how these ideas are integrated into all branches of our life in the universe. Students also investigate how these macroscopic ideas work in the environment of the very small and the environment of the very large by studying quantum mechanics and relativity. This course depends on geometry and trigonometry concepts, which may mean that some students will benefit from postponing this course until their senior year so they are familiar with these mathematical skills.

Evaluation: quizzes, class activities, and projects
Prerequisites: Integrated Biology and Integrated Chemistry; successful completion of Algebra II or concurrent approval by math and science department
Grade level: 11th or 12th

Advanced Placement Biology (Science/Yearlong)

AP biology is organized around the four key areas of evolution, genetics, cellular processes, and organismal biology, which encompass the core scientific principles, theories and processes governing living organisms and biological systems. Laboratory work is a major component of this course, and students will be required to spend time outside the normal class hours completing laboratory procedures and reports. In addition, due to the vast content knowledge requirement, students may also have to work independently on some self-study units, though lunch sessions will be scheduled to answer student questions on the self-study topics. AP Biology requires a significant overall commitment from the student and culminates with the AP Biology exam in May.

Evaluation: laboratory exercises, homework, quizzes, tests, and a cumulative final exam each semester
Prerequisites: completion of Integrated Biology and Integrated Chemistry with an overall grade of G or better, a descriptive letter of interest, and permission from the AP Biology instructor
Grade level: 11th or 12th

Advanced Placement Chemistry (Science/Yearlong)

The topics discussed in AP Chemistry cover the entire range of inorganic chemistry—atomic theory, reaction kinetics, thermochemistry, solutions chemistry, acids and bases, chemical equilibria, and periodic trends. Laboratory work is a major component of this course, and students will be required to spend time outside of the normal class hours completing laboratory procedures and reports. AP Chemistry requires a significant overall commitment from the student and culminates with the AP Chemistry exam in May. Students should anticipate doing some preparation work for AP Chemistry during the summer before the beginning of the academic year.

Evaluation: laboratory experiments, homework, quizzes, tests, and a cumulative final exam each semester.
Prerequisites: completion of Integrated Chemistry and Algebra I with an overall grade of G or better and/ or permission from the AP Chemistry instructor.
Grade level: 11th or 12th

You and Your Environment (Science/Semester)

You and Your Environment closely examines the impact of humans on the complex ecosystems of planet Earth. We investigate the effects of the logarithmic growth of the human population on non-human animals and their interactions with their abiotic environment. We also address the most significant ecological issues affecting humans, including urbanization, food supply, hunger and obesity, climate change, energy matters, and pollution. A large component of the class will involve participation in sustainability action projects at Galloway or within the local community.

Evaluation: quizzes, class activities, projects, participation, and discussion
Prerequisites: none
Grade level: all UL

Advanced Placement Environmental Science (Science/Yearlong)

AP Environmental Science is a course that integrates science and humanities and allows students to examine the process of science, interconversions of energy and matter in natural systems, interrelationships within natural systems, and the effects of human activity on the environment. The focus of this course will be on the development of inquiry and critical thinking skills to better understand the connections between the environment and human needs. Although taking the AP exam is not a requirement, the course itself will be taught at a college level. Students who opt to take the exam will be provided with additional after-school or weekend sessions that focus specifically on test-taking skills for passing the AP exam. Specific topics covered include ecosystems and ecological principles; population dynamics; energy; renewable (water, soil, air, sun, ecosystems) and nonrenewable (geologic, fossil fuels, nuclear) resources and their management; conservation biology; land use; agriculture and pest control; pollution (water, air, land, solid waste, hazardous waste) and prevention; environmental health; global changes (climate, ozone depletion); restoration and remediation; environmental policy; sustainable development; and environmental planning.

Evaluation: independent and group projects, laboratory and field exercises, class discussion, tests and quizzes
Prerequisites: completion of Integrated Biology and Integrated Chemistry with an overall average of G or better, a descriptive letter of interest, and permission of the AP Environmental Science instructor; completion of Algebra II and Integrated Physics preferred
Grade level: 11th or 12th

Advanced Placement Physics 1 (Science/Year-long)

The AP Physics 1 course is designed to give students an understanding of the main principles of physics. The course is designed to be equivalent to the first semester of a freshman algebra based college course. Course content is based on the guidelines set forth by the College Board for the AP Physics 1 exam. While the main purpose of the course is prepare the student to take the AP Physics 1 exam in the Spring, It is also designed to provide a foundation in physics for future STEM students as well as those in life sciences, pre-med, and other fields not directly related to science. The course requires a strong mathematical foundation with students using algebra, geometry and trigonometry to model the physical world. Evaluation: quizzes, class activities, and projects Prerequisites: Integrated Biology and Integrated Chemistry; successful completion of Algebra II or concurrent approval by math and science department Grade level: 11th - 12th Anatomy & Physiology (Science/Year-long) Anatomy & Physiology covers the basics of human anatomy (structure) and physiology (function), including terminology, basic biochemistry, cells and tissues, and organ systems: integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic/immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Included, also, human disease processes.

Evaluation: quizzes, tests, class activities, projects, and participation
Prerequisites: Integrated Biology & Integrated Chemistry
Grade level: 11th & 12th

Introduction to Geology (Science/Semester 2)

Introduction to Geology covers the history of the earth, uniformitarian principle, plate tectonics and other geological processes such as mountain building, rocks and minerals, and, specifically, the geology of Georgia. Students will spend some time outside looking at landforms. Laboratories will focus on rock types and identification.

Evaluation: tests, labs, short and long-term projects, and participation.
Prerequisites: Integrated Chemistry
Grade level: 9-12

Ecology (Science/Semester)

Ecology is the study of how organisms interact with their environment. In this class, we examine how ecological processes affect individuals, populations, communities, ecosystems, and the planet Earth. We emphasize how environmental interactions have contributed to the complexity of living systems and how disturbance affects the environment and life on this planet. Topics explored include terrestrial and aquatic environments, population genetics and natural selection, population dynamics (growth, competition, predation, and symbiosis), biogeochemical cycles, food webs, and energy flow. There will be a significant lab component to this class.

Evaluation: quizzes, class activities, projects, and laboratory and field exercises
Prerequisites: none
Grade level: all UL

Scientific Research (Science/Semester)

This is a laboratory research-based course introducing the students to independent scientific experimentation. The students will learn to identify a research topic by evaluation of the relevant scientific literature, to properly design an experiment, to analyze scientific data with appropriate statistics, to draw supported conclusions from their data, and to present their research findings. Students will be expected to complete several guided inquiry and open-inquiry experiments in addition to an independent research project during the course of the semester. Students will be required to attend and participate in weekly journal club meetings where the class will discuss current scientific articles. The course will culminate with each student presenting their independent research projects at an evening "mini conference" to be held on the Galloway campus which will be open to the entire Galloway community.

Evaluation: Quizzes, laboratory notebook, laboratory reports, class activities, and projects
Prerequisites: Integrated Biology, recommendation from current science teacher, a descriptive letter of interest
Grade level: 10th, 11th, or 12th

Genetics (Science/Semester)

This course discusses the principles of genetics with application to the study of biological function at the level of molecules, cells, and multicellular organisms, including humans. The topics include: structure and function of genes, chromosomes and genomes, biological variation resulting from recombination, mutation, and selection, population genetics, use of genetic methods to analyze protein function, gene regulation and inherited disease.

Evaluation: quizzes, class activities, projects, and laboratory and field exercises
Prerequisites: Integrated biology
Grade level: 10th, 11th, 12th

World Languages

The world language requirement for Upper Learning is two-fold: students must complete the third level of a world language, and they must take three years of a world language in Upper Learning.

French I (World Language/Yearlong)

French I is a "daring" introduction to listening, speaking, reading, and writing in French. The emphasis is communication in an immersion environment. The class is conducted in French. Students demonstrate language acquisition through communicative activities such as dialogues, small group discussions, performance based assessments and authentic situational role play. Resources include a traditional textbook with online interactive activities, practice and video as well as TV5 Monde, current realia from Francophone culture - newspapers, magazines, cooking shows, art, popular music and film. Additional resources include community involvement with local French restaurants, the French-language Théâtre du Rêve and the Consul Général de la France and the High Museum of Art. With a communicative approach in the classroom, students are prepared to be able to function at a novice level in the many cultures of the Francophone world today.

Evaluation: performance based assessments, discussions, enthusiasm and participation, quizzes, interactive online activities, cultural and communicative projects, chapter tests and final examinations. Students must demonstrate cumulative mastery of the French 1 material in an exit exam at the end of the year to progress to French 2.
Prerequisites: none
Grade level: all UL

French II (World Language/Yearlong)

French II is a "dynamic" continuation of the acquisition of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in communicative French. The emphasis in an immersion environment is active preparation, enthusiastic participation and successful communication. Students demonstrate language acquisition through a variety of communicative activities such as dialogues, small group discussions, performance based assessments and authentic situational role play. Resources include a traditional textbook with online interactive activities, practice and video as well as TV5 Monde, current realia from Francophone culture - newspapers, magazines, cooking shows, art, popular music and film. Additional resources include community involvement with local French restaurants, the French-language Théâtre du Rêve and the Consul Général de la France and the High Museum. With a communicative approach in the classroom, students are prepared to be able to function at a novice level in the many cultures of the Francophone world today.

Evaluation: performance based assessments, discussions, enthusiasm and participation, quizzes, interactive online activities, cultural and communicative projects, chapter tests and final examinations. Students must demonstrate cumulative mastery of the French II material in an exit exam at the end of the year to progress to French III.
Prerequisites: French I
Grade level: all

UL French III (World Language/Yearlong)

French III is a "deliberate" continuation of the acquisition of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in communicative French. The emphasis in an immersion environment is active preparation, enthusiastic participation and successful communication. In French III, students will be able to sustain a conversation on a variety of topics with meaningful interaction. Students demonstrate language acquisition through a variety of communicative activities such as dialogues, small group discussions, performance based assessments and authentic situational role play. Resources include a traditional textbook with online interactive activities, practice and video as well as TV5 Monde, current realia from Francophone culture - newspapers, magazines, cooking shows, art, popular music and film. Additional resources include community involvement with local French restaurants, the French-language Théâtre du Rêve and the Consul Général de la France and the High Museum. With a communicative approach in the classroom, students are prepared to be able to function at a novice level in the many cultures of the Francophone world today.

Evaluation: performance based assessments, discussions, enthusiasm and participation, quizzes, interactive online activities, cultural and communicative projects, creative writing, chapter tests and final examinations. Students must demonstrate cumulative mastery of the French III material in an exit exam at the end of the year to progress to French IV.
Prerequisites: French II
Grade level: all UL

French IV (World Language/Yearlong)

This course is designed for students seeking to improve their command of French and pursue their interest in the French language and Francophone cultures. The course consists of oral and written assignments on a variety of topics chosen to increase the students' control of structures and vocabulary of the language. Movies, art, online activities, podcasts, news programs, cultural segments all provide opportunities to develop listening, speaking, writing and reading skills. Students are immersed in a variety of short stories, music, poetry and current events. The course also includes a thorough review of grammatical structures at a fairly advanced level in order to facilitate successful, authentic communication in French.

Evaluation: written and oral composition, quizzes, examinations, and improvement of the student's overall command of the language; students must show mastery of material through examinations at the end of each semester and through cumulative exit exams at the end of the year
Prerequisites: French III
Grade level: 11th or 12th

Advanced French Literature and Composition (World Language/Yearlong)

This course is designed for our students seeking to enrich their command of French and pursue their interest in the French language, Francophone cultures, hallmarks of French literature and composition. The course consists of oral and written assignments on a variety of literary selections chosen to increase the students' control of structures and vocabulary of the language. Movies, art, online activities, podcasts, news programs, cultural segments all provide opportunities to develop listening, speaking, writing and reading skills . Students are immersed in a variety of short stories, music, poetry and current events. The course also includes a thorough review of grammatical structures in context of literature selections in order to facilitate successful, authentic communication in French.

Evaluation: written and oral composition, performance based assessments, projects, quizzes, examinations, and improvement of the student's overall command of the language.
Prerequisites: French IV
Grade level: 12th

Latin I (World Language/Yearlong)

Latin I is an introduction to the Latin language. This course is designed to teach students the fundamentals of Latin grammar and vocabulary in order to read and translate Latin texts. In Latin I, students learn three noun declensions and four tenses of the verb in active voice. Students also learn about the history and culture of the Roman world. The textbook is Cambridge Latin Course I.

Evaluation: tests, quizzes, homework, and a final exam
Prerequisites: none
Grade level: all UL

Latin II (World Language/Yearlong)

Latin II extends the students' study of Latin grammar and vocabulary. In Latin II, students learn passive voice, comparison of adjectives, pronouns, infinitives, and subjunctive verbs. Students continue to learn about the history and culture of the Roman world. The textbook is Cambridge Latin Course II.

Evaluation: tests, quizzes, homework, projects, and a final exam
Prerequisites: Latin I
Grade level: all UL

Latin III (World Language/Yearlong)

Latin III extends the students' study of Latin grammar and vocabulary. The focus of the grammar in Latin III is the subjunctive mood and its uses in different clauses. Students continue to learn about the history and culture of the Roman world. The textbook is the Cambridge Latin Course.

Evaluation: tests, quizzes, homework, projects, and a final exam
Prerequisites: Latin II
Grade level: 10th, 11th or 12th

Latin IV (World Language/Yearlong)

The fourth year of Latin focuses on reading selections from various Latin prose and poetry authors. Selections come from authors such as Caesar, Cicero, Livy, Vergil, Catullus, and Ovid. Students learn to translate the selections and work with meters in poetry.

Evaluation: tests, quizzes, homework, projects, and a final exam
Prerequisites: Latin III
Grade level: 10th, 11th or 12th

Latin V (World Language/Yearlong)

This course is designed as an advanced reading course of selections from Vergil's Aeneid and Caesar's Gallic Wars. Students read these selections at an accelerated pace. Students also learn about the themes covered in the reading selection, poetic meters, and devices.

Evaluation: homework, quizzes, tests, projects, and a final exam
Prerequisites: Latin IV
Grade Level: 11th or 12th

Spanish I (World Language/Yearlong)

This class is an introduction to Spanish as a second language. By the end of the school year, students will achieve an understanding of familiar everyday expressions and very basic phrases and will be able to interact in a simple way in the language. Students will obtain a solid understanding of present tense verbs. Students will meet an A1 level in accordance with the Common European Framework.

Evaluation: homework, quizzes, chapter tests, oral proficiency, final exams, projects, and exit exams
Prerequisites: none
Grade level: all UL

Spanish II (World Language/Yearlong)

In this class, students will build on previous knowledge and ability in order to achieve an A2 level in accordance with the Common European Framework. By the end of the school year, students will be able to communicate with a richer vocabulary and use of preterite and imperfect tenses to describe aspects of his/her background, immediate environment, and matters in areas of immediate need.

Evaluation: oral proficiency (presentations and reports), homework, quizzes, chapter tests, final/exit exams, projects, and participation.
Prerequisites: Spanish I
Grade level: all UL

Advanced Spanish II (World Language/Yearlong)

In this class, students will continue to further develop and improve listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. The goal is to achieve a B1 level in accordance to the Common European Framework. Emphasis is placed on comprehension of Spanish, as well as, reading and writing practice in the target language using a variety of activities incorporating familiar vocabulary and structures. Students will be able to produce simple connected text on topics which are familiar or of personal interest. Students will be able to describe experiences and events in the past, as well as, to talk about dreams, hopes & ambitions. They will briefly give reasons and explanations for opinions and plans, and express commands. Supplementary materials are introduced to enhance language use.

Evaluation: oral proficiency (presentations and report), homework, quizzes, chapter tests, final/exit exams, projects, and participation.
Prerequisites: Spanish I
Grade level: all UL

Spanish III (World Language/Yearlong)

In this class, students will build on previous knowledge and ability in order to achieve a B1 level in accordance with the Common European Framework. By the end of the school year, students will be able to communicate in most situations likely to arise while traveling in an area where the language is spoken and describe experiences and events, opinions, hopes, dreams, plans, and ambitions.

Evaluation: homework, quizzes, chapter tests, oral proficiency, final exams, projects, and exit exam
Prerequisites: Spanish II
Grade level: all UL

Advanced Spanish III (World Language/Yearlong)

This is a course designed to achieve, at the end of the school year, a B2 level in accordance with the Common European Framework. Students will be able to use Spanish in realistic, contemporary settings that will prepare them to speak with and write to Spanish-speakers in real-life situations. Students will be able to communicate in most situations likely to arise while traveling in an area where the language is spoken and describe experiences and events, opinions, hopes, dreams, plans, and ambitions.

Evaluation: Oral proficiency (presentations and reports), homework, quizzes, chapter tests, and final exams
Prerequisites: Spanish II
Grade level: 10th, 11th or 12th

Spanish IV (World Language/Yearlong)

In this class, students will build on previous knowledge and ability in order to achieve a C1 level in accordance with the Common European Framework. By the end of the school year, students will be able to interact with a degree of fluency and spontaneity that makes regular interaction with native speakers possible without strain for either party. They will produce clear, detailed text on a wide range of subjects and understand the main ideas of complex text.

Evaluation: oral proficiency (presentations and reports), homework, quizzes, chapter tests, final/exit exams, and participation.
Prerequisites: Spanish III
Grade level: 10th, 11th or 12th

Advanced Spanish IV (World Language/Yearlong)

In this class, students will build on previous knowledge and ability in order to achieve a C1 level in accordance with the Common European Framework. Students will improve and refine their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Emphasis continues to be placed on aural skills with additional emphasis on reading and writing in the target language. Supplementary materials are implemented to enhance language use. Students experience multiple opportunities to demonstrate their proficiency in Spanish in different contexts. Aspects of contemporary Hispanic culture are emphasized through cultural readings, media, games, and class discussions.

Evaluation: oral proficiency (presentations and report), homework, quizzes, chapter tests, final/exit exams, projects, and participation.
Prerequisites: Spanish III
Grade level: 10th, 11th or 12th

Advanced Placement Spanish Language (World Language/ Yearlong)

In this class, students will achieve a C2 level in accordance with the Common European framework. At the end of the course, students will be able to understand a wide range of longer texts and recognize implicit meaning, express his/herself fluently and spontaneously without too much obvious searching for expressions and produce clear, well-structured text on complex subjects, showing controlled use of organizational patterns, connectors, and cohesive devices.

Evaluation: homework, quizzes, chapter tests, oral proficiency, and final exams
Prerequisites: Spanish IV with teacher recommendation and completion of summer assignment
Grade level: 12th

Fine Arts

VISUAL ARTS

Students in grades 9 – 12 receive Fine Arts credit for a variety of visual arts electives taught by an outstanding Visual Arts Faculty. Classes offered include Introductory classes in 2D and 3D Art, intermediate classes in Painting, Drawing, Sculpture and Ceramics and advanced art classes including AP Art and AP Art History.

Additional electives in visual arts include Photography 1 and 2, Graphic Design and Film Making.

A variety of extracurricular opportunities abound for interested UL students. The Art Club works with the art teacher to prepare the annual showcase at the High Museum of Art as well as at various exhibits and festivals throughout the Atlanta area.


INTRODUCTORY

2D Art

This course gives students the opportunity to learn in two-dimensional media like drawing, painting, and printmaking. It will cover compositional strategies, color theory, idea development, response, formal analysis, and art history. Students in this course will get to make art and gain skills that will serve them in courses both in and outside of the arts. It is intended to prepare a student for taking intermediate visual arts classes or as a fun elective.

Evaluation - Evaluation of process journal, drawings and sketches, studio work, and written or recorded response. Research project.
Prerequisites - None
Grade Level - All UL

3D Art

This course gives students the opportunity to learn in three-dimensional media and will focus on utilitarian ceramics, and sculpture. It will cover important skills and composition strategies when working with clay, wire, paper, cardboard, and wood. It will also provide an insight into the art appreciation and art history of three-dimensional media. It is intended to prepare a student for taking intermediate visual arts classes or as a fun elective.

Evaluation: Evaluation of process journal, drawings and sketches, studio work, and written or recorded response. Research project.
Prerequisites: None
Grade Level: All

INTERMEDIATE

All of the intermediate classes build upon concepts learned in the introductory courses; however, the introductory courses are not required if the student feels confident in keeping up with the work. These classes should be taken by students who have an interest in the visual arts and/or any of the disciplines outlined below.

Drawing

The drawing course will build upon the compositional skills learned in the 2D or 3D course through charcoal, pencil, ink, and watercolor. Students will complete projects that help them develop abilities in rendering space, expressing with line, accurately rendering life, deliberate abstraction, and drawing for communication. The students will also get practice in formal analysis, and have an introduction to critical interpretation.

Evaluation: Evaluation of process journal, drawings and sketches, studio work, and written or recorded response. Small research projects throughout term.
Prerequisites: 2D or 3D art, or permission from Mr. Allen
Grade Level : All UL

Painting

The painting course will build upon the compositional skills learned in the 2D or 3D course through watercolor, acrylic, oils, and gouache. Students will complete projects that examine color theory, deliberately employing the principles of design, and the differences between linear and painterly expression. The students will also get practice in formal analysis, and have an introduction to critical interpretation.

Evaluation: Evaluation of process journal, drawings and sketches, studio work, and written or recorded response. Small research projects throughout term.
Prerequisites: 2D or 3D art, or permission from Mr. Allen
Grade Level: All UL

Sculpture

The sculpture course will build upon the compositional skills learned in the 2D or 3D course through three-dimensional materials like clay, cardboard, and plaster. Students will complete projects that will help them develop abilities in manipulating form and mass, and thinking in three dimensions. The students will also get practice in formal analysis and have an introduction to critical interpretation.

Evaluation: Evaluation of process journal, drawings and sketches, studio work, and written or recorded response. Small research projects throughout term.
Prerequisites: 2D or 3D art, or permission from Mr. Allen
Grade Level: All UL

Ceramics

The ceramics course will build upon the compositional skills learned in the 2D or 3D course through creating functional, clay objects. The four main systems of hand building will be explored; pinching, coil, slab construction, and throwing. Units will be a combination of technical and aesthetic principles in and will employ both the creative and design processes. The students will learn to use formal analysis when looking at functional objects.

Evaluation: Evaluation of process journal, drawings and sketches, studio work, and written or recorded response. Small research projects throughout term.
Prerequisites: 2D or 3D art, or permission from Mr. Allen
Grade Level: All UL

Photography

This course will build upon compositional skills learned in the 2D or 3D courses through photography. Print and digital media will examine both artistic and design oriented genres employing different types of photography like portrait, set-up, landscape, and documentary. The students will learn about using the camera, the lab, and digital editing software. The students will also get practice in formal analysis and have an introduction to critical interpretation.

Evaluation: Evaluation of process journal, drawings and sketches, studio work, and written or recorded response. Small research projects throughout term.
Prerequisites: 2D or 3D art, or permission from Mr. Allen
Grade Level: All UL

ADVANCED

Advanced Placement Studio Art

This is a series of externally assessed courses where the students create a body of work around one of three disciplines: 2D Design, 3D Design, and Drawing. Each course carries a required amount of work to be completed by the end of the school year, twenty-four pieces for 2D and Drawing, eighteen for 3D. Each portfolio contains two parts, a Concentration, where art is made around a conceptual or visual theme, and Breadth, which will indicate the student’s ability to explore a variety of media and styles. This course should be taken by students who want to earn college credit for visual art or are interested in attending art school. Ap Studio Art is the only year-long course in the visual arts department.

Evaluation: Based upon completion of work as it pertains to AP portfolio, demonstrated understanding of elements of art and principles of design.
Prerequisites: Demonstrated ability to produce work according to time schedule, basic understanding of concepts behind elements of art and principles of design, and permission from Mr. Allen.
Grade Level: 11th and 12th

Advanced Art Studies

Choosing any of the intermediate disciplines; students create three units of their own design per semester. Each unit will be expected to have idea development, design, execution, and response components. These courses are designed for students who want to further their skills in a particular discipline and/or desire to create work about particular themes. An ability to employ both formal analysis and critical interpretation will be required.

Evaluation: Three completed units that show art work made around a conceptual framework. Each unit will contain demonstrated idea development and design, studio work, and written or recorded response. Small research projects throughout term.
Prerequisites: Demonstrated ability to follow creative process, and working knowledge of chosen media. Permission from Mr. Allen required.
Grade Level: 10th - 12th

MUSIC

Students in grades 9 – 12 receive Fine Arts credit for participating in Band, Orchestra, Guitar Ensemble or Chorus. Rehearsals are held during the school day and include a wide variety of musical styles from classical to rock and roll to world music. Each ensemble presents a variety of concerts throughout the year for the Galloway community and beyond.

Additional electives in music include AP Music Theory, Digital Music Recording, Music X, and Song Writing. The musical interests and talents of the students drive these electives. Galloway’s music faculty work closely with professionals in the music industry in developing the courses, inviting in guest artists from the music community to work with the students and give professional feedback on student generated work with an eye towards providing students with real world experiences related to the music industry.

A variety of performing opportunities abounds for interested UL students. In addition to participation in Band, Orchestra, Guitar Ensemble or Chorus, students may sign-up to play in the pit for the Galloway Theatre Company musical, play in the pep band for home sports events, participate in the Jug Band led by a beloved UL history teacher, improvise with the jazz ensemble or begin their own rock band with support from the music faculty.

Students interested in pursuing music as a career may also wish to participate in GISA Honors Orchestra, Chorus and Band and the GMEA All State Ensembles with support from the Galloway music faculty.

Chorus (Fine Arts/Yearlong)

Students will learn to sing choral literature from a variety of time periods and places. Classical, folk, world, and a cappella/pop are some of the genres we will explore. Emphasis will be placed on learning to be expressive singers using beautiful, blended tone as well as mastering music-reading skills. Students will be given the opportunity to audition for All State Chorus and other state and regional events. Individual assistance will be given outside of class to help students prepare for auditions. There will be at least one major performance each semester, and we will seek to take advantage of additional opportunities that may arise.

Materials: black folder for music and a pencil at every rehearsal; full coverage black semi-formal attire for concerts
Evaluation: attitude, participation, rehearsal and performance attendance, cooperation and effort; evaluations are not talent-based
Prerequisites: students should be able to echo a simple tune
Grade level: all UL

Band (Fine Arts/Yearlong)

UL Band is a course that explores diverse musical styles from classical to contemporary. Class direction and musical choices are made by the director and the students in the ensemble. Instruction in some music theory is also included. Any student who has a love of music, can read music notation and is interested in performing is encouraged to participate. Students who are beginning an instrument should talk with the instructor about participation in band and will be considered on a case by case basis. Separate ensembles from within band may be formed to meet the musical needs of each student. Students will have opportunities to perform in public. Students who perform on non-traditional band instruments (electric guitar, bass, piano, etc.) are welcome but must first receive permission of instructor.

Evaluation: evaluation is based on each student’s participation, preparation, projects and performances; evaluation is not talent-based
Prerequisites: permission of instructor, love of music, ability to read music and desire to participate and perform
Grade level: all UL

Orchestra (Fine Arts/Yearlong)

This class is open to all Upper Learning students, preferably with at least an intermediate playing level on violin, viola, cello, and bass. Students who have never played or who are beginners should consider private lessons for the summer/semester before they register for class. Repertoire includes classical, pop, jazz, and folk/fiddle styles and there is a research component that connects the music to other subject areas. Composing and theory assignments are also included in the curriculum. There are performance opportunities for soloists and smaller ensembles, based on student interest and ideas. Advanced students are eligible to audition for GMEA All State Orchestra.

Materials: Violin, Viola, Cello, or Bass, either supplied by student or rented through the school or through a music store
Evaluation: Music preparation, class participation, effort, class attendance. Evaluations are not talent-based.
Prerequisites: Intermediate or above level skills on the violin, viola, cello, or bass, or permission of instructor, love of music, and desire to participate and perform.
Grade level: all UL

Guitar Ensemble (Fine Arts/Yearlong)

This class is open to all Upper Learning students who currently play guitar (Note: This is not an introductory class). Students who have never played or who are beginners should consider private lessons for the summer/semester before they register for class. Repertoire is based on the interests of the students and can include pop, jazz, folk, classical and latin. Students will read both tablature and traditional music notation. Composing and music theory are also included in the curriculum. There are performance opportunities for soloists and smaller ensembles, based on student interest and ideas.

Evaluation: Music preparation, class participation, effort, class attendance. Evaluations are not talent based.
Grade Level: All UL

Songwriting (Fine Arts/semester)

Students will learn basic songwriting techniques in this hands-on class. Basic elements of music will be explored in relationship to how they can effectively be used to communicate meaning and emotion in song-writing. Students will develop a strong sense of form, melody, harmony, bass line development, and rhythm. Projects, in lead sheet format, will cover a variety of styles. Ability to play an instrument or sing is not required. Performances may arise out of a desire to share, but are not necessary or required of all students in order to be successful in this class.

Evaluations: Projects, homework, quizzes, participation, final project
Prerequisites: None, though ability to read music or tablature and/or play an instrument or sing is helpful.
Grade Level: All UL

Introduction to Music Recording (Fine Arts/semester)

This introductory music recording course covers the basic equipment and techniques of digital and analog music recording. Elements include basic acoustic principles, the history of music recording including tape machine operation, condenser and dynamic microphones, microphone placement, and mixing and editing. This project based class will include hands-on experiences with studio equipment in the recording booth. Students will use their laptops and will be introduced to Logic Pro software. Ability to play a musical instrument is not required for this class. The class may culminate in the production of a CD, depending on the interests and experience of students participating.

Evaluations: Projects, homework, quizzes, participation, final project
Prerequisites: None
Grade level: all UL

Music X (Arts/ One semester)

YOU provide the variable - X - in this new music course offering. The class is flexible and allows students to work on individual music projects. Students will set goals for gaining skills and knowledge in areas such as songwriting, composition, basic recording technology, basic music theory and/or greater proficiency on an instrument or voice. The students will also engage in weekly sessions of group music-making such as singing together, drum circles, basic jazz improv, etc.

Evaluation: grades will be determined primarily by meeting goals set at the beginning of the semester.
Prerequisites: Personal motivation. A willingness to give and receive feedback.
Grade level: all UL

One World: Music (semester)

Why does music hold such feeling and power? Students experience music from around the world through listening, performing, analysis, and movement and uncover the elements that hold it all together. From structure, perspective, and inspiration we explore what makes music meaningful; sometimes for one person, sometimes for an entire society.

Evaluation: Class Participation, completion of assignments, final project.
Prerequisites: None
Grade level: all UL

Music Revolution (semester)

Music is constantly in flux, shedding its skin every decade for a rebellion, usually driven by youth. How will your generation change music? Students learn about musical revolution through the decades, often helping to change society forever.

Evaluation: Class participation, quizzes, final project or presentation.
Prerequisites: None
Grade level: all UL

THEATRE

Students in grades 9 – 12 may elect to take theatre classes that earn students credit while exploring, deepening, and honing their skills in acting technique, performance styles, ensemble physical training, playwriting structure and script analysis. Theatre electives include Introduction to Theatre, Acting 1 and 2, Playwriting, Directing and Improvisation.

For those who love to perform, The Galloway Theatre Ensemble is a “no-cut”, energetic, fun and supportive group of students who enjoy sharing their love of theatre with audiences. The ensemble is open to any student regardless of experience, and encourages discipline and dedication to the development of their craft. The ensemble presents three productions throughout the school year including a fall play, winter play and spring musical. Though rehearsals are scheduled after school (periods 8 and 9) the students receive course credit for their work. Theater Ensemble members are also given the opportunity to represent Galloway at various conferences and competitions to share their work with other schools in the region.

Students in grades 9 – 12 may elect to take a variety of technical theatre classes that earn credit in Fine Arts and develop skills in technical theatre, stagecraft, CAD (computer assisted design), drafting, business management, and sound and lighting design and production. Technical Theatre electives include Introduction to Technical Theatre, Stagecraft, and CAD.

For those students who love theatre but would rather not be in the spotlight, The Galloway Theatre Ensemble Tech Crew is a “no-cut”, energetic, fun and supportive group of students who enjoy working together to bring each production to life. The ensemble is open to any student who completes the introductory class. The ensemble presents three productions throughout the school year including a fall play, winter play and spring musical. Theatre Tech Crew may sign up to participate in one production or all three. Though rehearsals are scheduled after school (periods 8 and 9) students receive credit towards graduation in Fine Arts.

Upperclassmen/women who excel in Theatre tech are provided countless opportunities to further their understanding and practice of Theatre Tech as Theatre Tech Interns. In the past these students have designed sets for ML productions, created and executed lighting designs for dance performances, and created and executed sound designs for musical productions.

Galloway Theatre Company: Acting, Fall Production (Fine Arts/ Semester)

Theatre Company is a course in which a full-length or a one act play will be staged. The play will be selected for its dramatic impact and ability to stimulate and challenge the actor. This class requires discipline, maturity, diligence, and a major commitment of time beyond regular school hours. The class meets after school daily and will culminate in a performance at the end of the semester.

Materials: work clothes and shoes, company T-shirt, and theatrical make-up
Evaluation: preparation, participation, cooperation, effort, and attendance
Prerequisites: none
Grade level: 10th, 11th, or 12th

Galloway Theatre Company: Acting, Winter Production (Fine Arts/ Semester)

Theatre Company, Winter Production is a course in which a full length or one-act play will be staged in the Next Stage space. The play will be selected for its dramatic impact and ability to stimulate and challenge the actor. This class is for the serious acting student and requires discipline, maturity, diligence, and commitment. The class is offered during the school day terms B and C. The class will culminate in a production at the end of Term C.

Materials: movement clothes and shoes, company T-shirt and theatrical make-up.
Evaluation: positive attitude, preparation, participation, cooperation, effort, and attendance
Prerequisites: none
Grade level: all UL

Galloway Musical Theatre Company: Acting, Spring Production (Fine Arts/Semester)

Musical Theatre Company is a semester course in which students prepare and perform in the spring musical. Students will gain an understanding and appreciation for many aspects of musical theater, including singing, dancing, and acting. This class is for the dedicated musical theater student and requires discipline, maturity, diligence, and commitment. The class meets after school daily and will culminate in a performance at the end of the semester in May.

Materials: movement clothes and shoes, company T-shirt, and theatrical make-up
Evaluation: positive attitude, participation, attendance, physical and emotional commitment, and effort
Prerequisites: Acting and Chorus are encouraged, although not required.
Grade level: all UL

Acting (Fine Arts/Semester)

This course is designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of the art and craft of acting and to develop basic acting skills. Imagination, relaxation, observation, concentration, and character development will be introduced through improvisation, theater games, scene work, and an acting text. The student will gain an understanding of the actor’s contribution to production. A final goal is to connect these skills and understandings with the student’s own interests, values, and career objectives.

Evaluation: participation, preparation, physical and emotional commitment, and effort
Prerequisites: none
Grade level: all UL

Advanced Acting (Fine Arts/Semester)

This course is designed to enhance the basic skills for serious acting students. Students will gain a deeper understanding of script analysis, vocal preparation and study acting styles for various periods in history. The student will perform scenes and short one-acts for invited audiences.

Evaluation: participation, preparation, physical and emotional commitment and effort
Prerequisites: Acting
Grade level: 10, 11 and 12

Playwriting (Fine Arts/Semester)

This class will focus on writing scenes, monologues, a 10-minute play and a short musical. Students will create material from pictures, overheard conversations, autobiographical sketches, dreams, and discussion to develop their playwriting skills.

Evaluation: participation, preparation, positive energy, risk-taking and commitment
Prerequisites: none, but previous acting experience will be beneficial
Grade level: all UL

Galloway Theatre Company Tech Crew I (Fine Arts/Semester)

The course will follow the development of a production from the first presentation of design to the final performance. Students will learn how the production side of a play is developed and how the areas of set construction, scene painting, sound, props, and lighting are organized and come together in the technical rehearsals and performances. The class is required to create and participate in Galloway Theatre Company productions, which will be performed during the school year as well as to oversee technical aspects for the Galloway Dance Ensemble and Holiday Luncheon. The class meets after normal school hours, on some weekends, and students must be not have any schedule conflicts the two weeks prior to performance.

Materials: work clothes and sturdy closed-toe shoes, black shirt, pants, and shoes
Evaluation: preparation, participation, cooperation, effort
Prerequisites: permission of instructor
Grade level: all UL

Galloway Theatre Company Tech Crew II (Fine Arts/Semester)

The course will follow the development of a production from the first presentation of design to the final performance. Students will learn how the production side of a musical is developed and how the areas of set construction, scene painting, sound, props, and lighting are organized and come together in the technical rehearsals and performances. The class is required to create and participate in Galloway Theatre Company productions, which will be performed during the school year. Tech Crew II will also aid in providing planning and technical elements for Galloway Dance Ensemble and graduation. The class meets after normal school hours, on some weekends, and students must be not have any schedule conflicts the two weeks prior to performance.

Materials: work clothes and sturdy closed-toe shoes, black shirt, pants, and shoes
Evaluation: preparation, participation, cooperation, effort
Prerequisites: permission of instructor
Grade level: all UL

Stagecraft (Fine Arts/Semester)

This course will follow the development of a production from the first presentation of design to the final performance. Students will learn how the production side of a play is developed, and how the areas of set construction, scene painting, sound, props, and lighting are organized and come together in the technical rehearsals and performances. The focus of the course will be on developing a team approach to the production process. As opposed to Tech Crew I and II, which meet after school, Stagecraft meets during the school day to give students who participate in other afterschool activities a chance to be involved in the Technical Theatre Program.

Materials: work clothes and sturdy closed-toe shoes
Evaluation: preparation, participation, cooperation, effort
Prerequisites: interview with the technical director
Grade level: all UL

2D & 3D Drafting with AutoCAD (Fine Arts/Semester)

In this course, students will learn the fundamentals of both hand and computer-aided technical drawing. While learning the basics of drafting through the lens of the entertainment world, we will explore skills and techniques that are useful to those also interested in architecture, engineering, and interior design. This course will focus on 2D techniques that include generating build plans, cross sections, elevations, lighting plots, and 3D modeling techniques.

Evaluation: participation, project-based assignments, and final project
Prerequisite: none
Grade level: all UL

Scenic Painting (Fine Arts/Semester)

This course will explore the methods of creating large-scale reproductions and faux finishes for theater and film. Students will learn color mixing, distressing, glazing, wood graining, trompe l’oeil, and different stone textures. We will discover different methods of transferring drawings and paintings to larger flats and canvases using projectors and pen-and-ink and grid techniques.

Materials: clothes that can get dirty with paint
Evaluation: participation, effort, project-based assignments, and final project
Prerequisite: none
Grade level: all UL

DANCE

Students in grades 9 – 12 may elect to take dance classes that earn students credit and satisfy Fine Arts or Kinetic Wellness requirements. In the Dance elective students explore dance technique by studying styles of different influential choreographers and dance companies. Classes incorporate modern dance, ballet, musical theater dance, and jazz, as well as improvisation and work with a variety of musical styles. Many dance-related subjects such as pilates and yoga as conditioning tools for the dancer are also explored.

Qualified students may also elect to study choreography. Students in the choreography classes often work with younger students as well as create pieces for the May concert of the Galloway Dance Ensemble. Choreography students also collaborate across disciplines to find inspiration for their work. One example from past collaborations involved working with the biology class to help demonstrate the complex processes of mitosis and meiosis through movement.

For those who love to perform, The Galloway Dance Ensemble is an energetic, fun and supportive group of students who enjoy sharing their love of dance with audiences. The ensemble is open to any student regardless of experience. The ensemble performs throughout the school year, giving two full-length concerts at the end of each semester as well as community outreach performances throughout the year.

Dance (Fine Arts/Quarter) (KM/Quarter)

In this course, students will explore dance technique by learning styles of different influential choreographers and dance companies. Classes will incorporate modern dance, ballet, musical theater dance, and jazz and will work with a variety of musical styles. Many dance-related subjects such as pilates and yoga as conditioning tools for the dancer will also be explored. In true Galloway fashion, these classes will be filled with individuals having a variety of backgrounds and experiences with dance. Students will work together to challenge each other and to experience this art form as a way to be healthy, active individuals. Performance opportunities will be offered but are not required.

Materials: comfortable movement clothes and soft-soled lace-up sneakers to be provided by each student; jazz or ballet shoes and dance clothing are helpful
Evaluation: participation, preparation, cooperation, effort
Prerequisites: none
Grade level: all UL

Mind Body Conditioning (Fine Arts/Quarter) (KM/Quarter)

This course is a fitness class in which students will practice movements inspired by exercise forms such as pilates, yoga, and modern dance. Students will work to develop mindful conditioning with movements designed to improve strength, body awareness, flexibility, and inner focus. The classes will also incorporate some improvisational movement exercises.

Materials: comfortable movement clothes, soft-soled lace-up sneakers, and a yoga mat to be provided by each student
Evaluation: participation, preparation, cooperation, effort
Prerequisites: none

Choreography (Fine Arts/Quarter)

This nine-week course is designed for the serious dance student. Students will be exposed to influential modern dance choreographers and dance companies and will study qualities that make each of them unique. Students will learn choreography techniques and begin to develop choreography projects of their own. 11th and 12th grade students will have the opportunity to develop a project for the Galloway Dance Ensemble. 10th grade students will be eligible their 11th and/or 12th grade year.

Materials: comfortable movement clothes and dance shoes, music for projects
Evaluation: participation, preparation, cooperation, and effort
Prerequisites: permission of the instructor is required; previous Galloway dance course or dance experience is required; Galloway Dance Ensemble is required for students wishing to choreograph for the ensemble.
Grade level: 10th, 11th or 12th

Galloway Dance Ensemble (Fine Arts/Yearlong or Semester possible with permission of instructor) (KM/Yearlong or Semester possible with permission of instructor)

This course is an ongoing performance class, which meets eighth period after regular school hours. Students at any level of dance may participate, but each student must make a commitment to the entire process of a performance. Credit for this class is determined by the instructor, based on extent of participation in rehearsals and performances. All Dance Ensemble members are strongly encouraged to sign up for the daytime dance courses as well as for Dance Ensemble.

Materials: black and pink ensemble dancewear and ballet shoes to be provided by each student
Evaluation: preparation, participation, cooperation, and effort
Prerequisites: dance class experience is helpful
Grade level: all UL

Advanced Dance Ensemble Performance Studies (Fine Arts/ Year-long or Semester possible with permission of instructor) (KM/Year-long or Semester possible with permission of instructor)

Participation in the Galloway Dance Ensemble as well as permission from the instructor are requirements for participation in this class. This course will allow advanced ensemble members additional concentration and small group focus in choreography for the Galloway Dance Ensemble performances as well as additional performances. It will also allow advanced ensemble members continued concentration on technique. In addition, students will learn choreography skills, study influential choreographers, and develop their own choreography.

Materials: black and pink ensemble dancewear and ballet shoes (same materials required for Galloway Dance Ensemble)
Evaluation: commitment to the schedule, preparation, participation, cooperation, and effort Prerequisites: permission of the instructor and Galloway Dance Ensemble experience
Grade level: 10th, 11th, or 12th

Kinetic Movement & Kinetic Wellness

One credit hour of Kinetic Movement / Wellness is required.

Kinetic Wellness / Movement (KW/M/Semester)

Kinetic Wellness / Movement is a course designed to educate students about the different components of fitness, various lifelong fitness activities, the benefits of developing and maintaining personal fitness and health, and consumer related, athletic, and social issues which impact overall quality of life. Under the Wellness component, students will learn concepts of nutrition and physical activity and the role they play on living a healthy lifestyle. Students will explore topics including but not limited to health-related components of fitness: cardiorespiratory, muscular endurance, muscular strength, body composition, and flexibility. In addition, alcohol and drug health, sexual behavior, CPR and standard first aid, injury prevention, mental and emotional health will also be explored. In regards to the Movement section, students will participate in various lifelong fitness activities such as aerobic and anaerobic conditioning, muscular strength and endurance training, core and flexibility exercises, and plyometrics. Individual skills will development through team sports and group games. Students will develop and implement a personal fitness plan by choosing their own physical exercises. Evaluation: Students earn points daily for participation in class discussions and topic assignments. There will be up to six quizzes, one final comprehensive test, a nutrition assignment, and current events. Prerequisites: none Grade level: all UL

Muscular Strength and Endurance Training (KM/Quarter)

Muscular Strength and Endurance Training is a term course designed to explore resistance training in depth. Students will participate in a resistance-training program designed to increase both muscular strength and muscular endurance. Resistance exercises with the use of free weights, nautilus machines, medicine balls, speed trac, bans and others will be used. Students will demonstrate correct lifting techniques, increase awareness of resistance exercises, and develop a personal fitness plan. Evaluation: Daily participation and one personal fitness plan Prerequisites: Kinetic Wellness / Movement class Grade level: all UL

Kinetic Movement II (KM/Quarter)

Kinetic Movement II is a term class designed to focus on in depth cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility training, and core exercises.

Evaluation: Daily participation, one personal fitness plan, and ability to work independently
Prerequisites: Kinetic Wellness / Movement
Grade level: all UL

Cross-listed courses:

  • Dance (Fine Arts/Quarter) or (KM/Quarter)
  • Ballet Studies (Fine Arts/Quarter) or (KM/Quarter)
  • Mind Body Conditioning (Fine Arts/Quarter) or (KM/Quarter)
  • Galloway Dance Ensemble (Fine Arts/Yearlong) or (KM/Yearlong)

Electives

Business & Marketing (Elective/Semester)

This class will introduce students to several areas of business including entrepreneurship, accounting, marketing, advertising, and sales. Students will have the opportunity to work in a student-run business on campus, learn how to write a business plan and delve into both the creative and sales sides of marketing and advertising.

Evaluation: participation, projects, and class assignments
Prerequisites: none
Grade level: All

Entrepreneurship (Elective/Semester)

In this introductory business course, students learn the basics of planning and launching their own successful business. Whether they want to start their own money-making business or create a non-profit to help others, this course helps students develop the core skills they need to be successful. They learn how to come up with new business ideas, attract investors, market their business, and manage expenses. Students hear inspirational stories of teen entrepreneurs who have turned their ideas into reality, and then they plan and execute their own business by creating a business and marketing plan.

Grade level: All

Introduction to Yearbook (Elective/Quarter)

Introduction to Yearbook is a one-term class that includes layout design, photographic composition, computer graphics and page design, digital photography, and yearbook tools. The class will work on a spring supplement and pages for use in the yearbook for the following year. This class is required for any student who wishes to be on the yearbook staff the following year. Current staff members should not take this course.

Evaluation: photographs, page layouts, and computer designs
Prerequisite: none
Grade level: 10th or 11th

Yearbook (Elective/Yearlong)

The main focus of this course is the preparation and publication of the school yearbook. Students are actively engaged in producing the yearbook. To meet deadlines, students will be required, from time to time, to work beyond the normal school day.

Evaluation: commitment, timeliness of assigned projects
Prerequisites: Introduction to Yearbook
Grade Level: 11th or 12th

The Revolutionary Journalist (Elective/Yearlong)

This yearlong course is designed to expose students to award-winning journalism, with a specific focus on The Podcast. Students will explore a variety of topics and titles; a close study of episodes, with particular attention to journalistic strategy, will inspire students to write and produce their own investigative, well-researched podcast at semester’s end.

Evaluation: Student editorials; article/episode analysis; class participation
Prerequisites: Admission to this course must be approved by the instructor
Grade level: all UL

Galloway Magazine

The curriculum is delivered in a studio setting. Teacher-facilitated, this class will be student-led as part of a senior project. Students will learn the basics of graphic design and Adobe software while assuming roles on a magazine staff. Student will design and define space, brand sections and apply elements of art: Line, Shape, Color, Value, Form, Texture and Space, integrating these concepts into computer generated layout and design. Students will become part of the process and produce a glossy magazine each semester that they can add to their personal portfolio. As graphic designers, students will use the principles that drive the creative elements to target specific marketing strategies.

Evaluation: classwork, output production, homework not required, but students are encouraged to keep their creativity open at all times and extend their learning
Prerequisites: none
Grade level: 10, 11, 12

Graphic Design Studio Techniques (Tech/Semester)

This curriculum re-enforces the study of the Elements of Art: Line, Shape, Color, Value, Form, Texture and Space, integrating these concepts into computer generated graphic art. Students will learn how to design and produce professional level graphic design. As graphic designers, students will learn the principles that drive the creative elements to target specific marketing strategies.

Evaluation: classwork, output production, no required homework
Prerequisites: none
Grade level: all UL

Introduction to Python (Tech/Semester)

Intro to Programming is an elective designed as an introduction to fundamental programming concepts and how they are used. The introduction to programming strand will introduce students to Python programming and best practices in programming professions.

Evaluation: classwork, output production, no required homework
Prerequisites: none
Grade level: all

Design Engineering (Tech/Semester)

Students will be introduced to the design process and advanced problem solving strategies. They will learn digital sketching and drawing techniques used by engineers and apply measurement and scale to their designs. Mechanics and electronics will be explored as well as design thinking tools and an exploration of client feedback for determining success. Students will participate in design challenges in cooperative teams to simulate the engineering environment.

Evaluation: classwork, output production
Prerequisites: Math/Sciences
Grade level: all UL

Big Data: Collection, Analysis and Presentation

An exploration of how the Digital Revolution as generated a new industry of collecting, analyzing and leveraging the massive amounts of information available and being generated. Students will be able to differentiate between data, information and evidence, as well as Projects will include mobile app design, data collection assignments and presentations based on collected data that has become evidence. Evaluation: classwork, output production Prerequisites: Python Programming Grade level: all UL Problems and Projects in Computer Science An overview of computer history, technology ideas, networking terms, and usage of the concepts in practical applications. Students will have hands on experiences constructing computers and connecting them into a network. Other projects include data transfers across platforms, examination of hardware and peripherals, and exercises in computer security.

Evaluation: classwork, output production
Prerequisites: Math/Sciences
Grade level: all UL

Projects in Computer Science

An overview of computer history, technology ideas, networking terms, and usage of the concepts in practical applications. Students will have hands on experiences constructing computers and connecting them into a network. Other projects include data transfers across platforms, examination of hardware and peripherals, and exercises in computer security.

Evaluation: classwork, output production
Prerequisites: Math/Sciences
Grade level: all UL

Game Design Survey I Year 1/2 (Parts 1 & 2 are prereq to Design Experience- Tech/Semester)

An overview of game design skills and disciplines, students will explore the art, writing, sounds, music, psychology and programming of video games / interactive digital media. Students will participate in all aspects of game design process, including project management, script writing, back story creation, character design, sound recording, programming and evaluation analysis. This course will show the practical application of numerous academic disciplines in an engaging introduction to a fast growing international industry. Survey 1 focuses on intro to programming and graphic design basics. These courses are interchangeable and do not need to be taken in sequence or even in the same year.

Evaluation: classwork, output production
Prerequisites: None
Grade Level: All UL

Game Design Survey II Year 1/2 (Parts 1 & 2 are prereq to Design Experience- Tech/Semester)

An overview of game design skills and disciplines, students will explore the art, writing, sounds, music, psychology and programming of video games / interactive digital media. Students will participate in all aspects of game design process, including project management, script writing, back story creation, character design, sound recording, programming and evaluation analysis. This course will show the practical application of numerous academic disciplines in an engaging introduction to a fast growing international industry. Survey 2 focuses on intro to design engineering and digital storytelling basics. These courses are interchangeable and do not need to be taken in sequence or even in the same year.

Evaluation: classwork, output production
Prerequisites: None
Grade Level: All UL

Game Design Experience Year 2/3/4 (Parts 1 & 2 are prereqs)

Students will work towards the production of a multi-level, fully immersive game project. Various jobs will be assigned based on student interests, including script writers, level editors, voice directors, musical producers, character designers, background and element artists, programmers and quality assurance editors. As tasks will be combined into a cohesive and connected whole, team collaboration and communication will be of utmost importance.

Evaluation: classwork, output production
Prerequisites: Game Design Survey
Grade Level: All UL

Game Design Portfolio Year 3/4 (Tech/Yearlong)

Students who demonstrate leadership abilities in Game Design Experience can proceed into Game Design Portfolio, as team leaders, editors, designers. Students will demonstrate a wide range of skills from Game Design Experience and will assist and encourage other students in strengthening their abilities. Students will be responsible for the project management, deadlines, quality of work and content choices that go into the final outcome. (Year 4 would be an independent study)

Evaluation: classwork/output production
Prerequisites: Game Design Experience
Grade Level: 11th and 12th

Filmmaking (Tech/Semester)

Working in small groups on a topic of choice, students learn the elements of scripting, researching, storyboarding, filming and editing a professional level quality film documentary suitable for Web and broadcast distribution.

Evaluation: classwork, output production, no required homework
Prerequisites: none
Grade level: all UL

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